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Archive for September 2010

My experience upgrading UNE 10.04 to Maverick (and yours!)

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As you might know, Ubuntu version for netbooks, UNE, is having a major re-engineering work for Maverick Meerkat,  soon to be Ubuntu 10.10. The old interface, which included packages like netbook-launcher or maximus, is going to be replaced by Unity. If you don’t know what Unity is, the nice people behing OMGubuntu published some days ago a nice review of the brand new UNE interface.

I will give you a clue: it does look very different from what you’re used to. That’s why we want to collect as many reports as possible of people upgrading from UNE 10.04 to 10.10 (with Unity).

My experience upgrading

OK, I don’t want to ask people to test something if I haven’t (and I have the means for it). I took my Dell Mini 9 (well, technically is Canonical’s, but, anyway) and I installed Ubuntu Netbook Edition 10.04.1 in Spanish. The installation went very well and fast.

After reboot, I updated my 10.04 installation and started the upgrade to Unity. Although the upgrade itself did not have any major problems it took almost six hours! Of course, I reported this as bug 646638. I talked with Michael Vogt on IRC and he will investigate.

Once the upgrade finished everything worked as expected: the language was still Spanish and there were no major crashes. Nevertheless, the global menu stayed there with “File Editar” even when no applications were running. I filed that as bug 646890 in Unity.

Apart from that, I found a couple of bugs in the Dash, but unrelated with the upgrade itself. These are bugs 646758 and 646756.

Your experiences upgrading

My system is not a real system. I use the Dell Mini 9 with SSD 8GB for testing purposes. I don’t use it on a daily basis. I reinstall almost every flavour of Ubuntu on it every milestone. My upgrade experience was from a nice, cleaned, UNE 10.04 to 10.10. No PPAs or third party software installed.

That’s why we need real feedback from the people that often use UNE 10.04 on their upgrades to 10.10. If you want to participate in our testing effort, just follow the next steps:

  1. Create an account in our tracker
  2. Upgrade to Maverick
  3. Report back!

Use my testing report as an example. You see that you can add comments (like the system you used,or general impressions) and, of course, add bug numbers if you encounter any.

Thanks and happy testing!

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Written by Ara Pulido

September 24, 2010 at 3:20 pm

Posted in ubuntu

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So far, so good

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It’s been more than two years since I started working at Canonical and, although I have been blogging about my daily job here, I have never talked about how this job is important to me.

I love testing software. Yes, I know it seems strange to love an activity that some other people find a bit tedious, but I do. I was a full time developer when I discovered that I liked testing the software. Testing software gets you the opportunity to see the product as a whole, but without losing the technical part of the job. So, when I got the opportunity to work at Canonical as a member of the Ubuntu QA team it was like a dream job. Not only I was going to be able to test free software during my daily job but, also, I was going to test ALL the free software that is included in Ubuntu.

When I was hired, one of my first missions was to create a way to to test the desktop in a repeatable way, easy to maintain. That’s how Mago project started, a couple of years ago. Working on this project has been great, as it has been working closely with LDTP upstream developers. I have contributed to LDTP through bug reports, patches and helping with the release of LDTP in Ubuntu. I always tried that the latest LDTP was successfully released and uploaded to Ubuntu.

I specially remember when we were trying to get the latest LDTP before Ubuntu 10.04 Feature Freeze. Nagappan, the main LDTP upstream developer and I worked closely on IRC to meet the deadline. Together, we fixes issued, verified them, got everything together and got it uploaded it to Ubuntu just in time. It was the perfect example of Open Source collaboration.

Mago, itself, is free software, released under the GPLv3. People inside and outside Canonical have contributed to it with bug reports, patches, new features and, of course, new tests to test the desktop applications, often GNOME applications.

But, apart from Mago and desktop testing automation, I am specially happy to be able to test all the open source bits that make Ubuntu: from the kernel to the desktop, from brand new topics as Multitouch, to all time classics as Firefox.

I work for Canonical, testing free software, trying to make it better for everybody. I need to remind myself everyday how privilege I am.

Written by Ara Pulido

September 16, 2010 at 6:26 am

Posted in canonical

Multitouch testers in the Hall of Fame

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Thanks to Daniel Holbach, the people testing uTouch and reporting back in the Multitouch Testing Tracker now appear in the Ubuntu Hall of Fame.

If you have been helping testing MT and you’re name does not appear there, is due to a bug in the ISO tracker, that prevents testers that haven’t set their Launchpad ID properly. This bug has been fixed, and it will be released in our next roll out of the testing tracker, but, in the mean while, there is a workaround that I explained in a previous post.

Please, if you are helping testing uTouch, check out how to appear in the Hall Of Fame.

Written by Ara Pulido

September 3, 2010 at 11:56 am

Posted in Uncategorized

GUADEC 2010 Videos

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This year, due to family commitments, I was unable to attend GUADEC. Although the reason why I couldn’t attend made me very happy, I also was sad by the fact that I wasn’t going to be able to attend one my favourites FOSS conferences.

Happily, and thanks to Flumotion,  the videos are now available for download.

I have started downloading some of them and, of course, the first talk that I watched was the one given by my good friend, excellent hacker and accessibility advocate, Eitan Isaacson. In his talk, Eitan explains in a non technical way, why it is important to have accessibility in mind when designing any kind of products: from buildings to software. If you are a software designer or developer, I really recommend watching his talk. I am sure you will start thinking about accessibility when designing your next application.

Written by Ara Pulido

September 1, 2010 at 7:34 am

Posted in Uncategorized