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LoCo Teams on the Hall Of Fame

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As you may know, during Maverick cycle we introduced statistics from our testers to be reflected in the Ubuntu Hall Of Fame. Well, now, and thanks to my good friend Daniel Holbach, we have, not only individual statistics, but also statistics by LoCo team.

This is how it looks on the Hall Of Fame. Nifty, isn’t it?

Written by Ara Pulido

October 13, 2010 at 11:42 am

On First Experiences

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Everybody agrees how important the Out-Of-Box experience is for a product. If the users’ first experience with any kind of product is frustrating it is very likely that they’ll return it and never look back.

On Operating Systems, usually, this first experience is turning on the computer and reply to some basic questions. For all the major OS like Windows or Mac OS, the software comes preinstalled in the computer. For many users, therefore, that’s the computer itself: something that you turn on and it starts working.

For Linux is quite different. Despite the efforts that some companies (including Canonical) are doing in order to be easier and easier to buy a computer with a Linux distribution preinstalled, nowadays, the first experience a user has with Linux is, most of the times, a CD and an installation process. Well, if you then want to have one of the best first Linux experiences ever, wait until Sunday and install the brand new Ubuntu 10.10. Its installation process is, ladies and gentlemen, pure joy:

I would like to congratulate the Ubiquity team for the fantastic work they do every six months. They make the first experience of those people who start with Linux better every time. It is great to have the opportunity to work with you, guys.

Written by Ara Pulido

October 7, 2010 at 11:45 am

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My experience upgrading UNE 10.04 to Maverick (and yours!)

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As you might know, Ubuntu version for netbooks, UNE, is having a major re-engineering work for Maverick Meerkat,  soon to be Ubuntu 10.10. The old interface, which included packages like netbook-launcher or maximus, is going to be replaced by Unity. If you don’t know what Unity is, the nice people behing OMGubuntu published some days ago a nice review of the brand new UNE interface.

I will give you a clue: it does look very different from what you’re used to. That’s why we want to collect as many reports as possible of people upgrading from UNE 10.04 to 10.10 (with Unity).

My experience upgrading

OK, I don’t want to ask people to test something if I haven’t (and I have the means for it). I took my Dell Mini 9 (well, technically is Canonical’s, but, anyway) and I installed Ubuntu Netbook Edition 10.04.1 in Spanish. The installation went very well and fast.

After reboot, I updated my 10.04 installation and started the upgrade to Unity. Although the upgrade itself did not have any major problems it took almost six hours! Of course, I reported this as bug 646638. I talked with Michael Vogt on IRC and he will investigate.

Once the upgrade finished everything worked as expected: the language was still Spanish and there were no major crashes. Nevertheless, the global menu stayed there with “File Editar” even when no applications were running. I filed that as bug 646890 in Unity.

Apart from that, I found a couple of bugs in the Dash, but unrelated with the upgrade itself. These are bugs 646758 and 646756.

Your experiences upgrading

My system is not a real system. I use the Dell Mini 9 with SSD 8GB for testing purposes. I don’t use it on a daily basis. I reinstall almost every flavour of Ubuntu on it every milestone. My upgrade experience was from a nice, cleaned, UNE 10.04 to 10.10. No PPAs or third party software installed.

That’s why we need real feedback from the people that often use UNE 10.04 on their upgrades to 10.10. If you want to participate in our testing effort, just follow the next steps:

  1. Create an account in our tracker
  2. Upgrade to Maverick
  3. Report back!

Use my testing report as an example. You see that you can add comments (like the system you used,or general impressions) and, of course, add bug numbers if you encounter any.

Thanks and happy testing!

Written by Ara Pulido

September 24, 2010 at 3:20 pm

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Call for Testing: Hardy Firefox Users (or willing to install Hardy in a VM)

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Background

Firefox 3.0 and xulrunner 1.9 are now unsupported by Mozilla. Rather than backporting security fixes to these now, we are moving to a support model where we will be introducing major new upstream versions in stable releases. The reason for this is the support periods from Mozilla are gradually becoming shorter, and it will be more and more difficult for us to maintain our current support model in the future.

What we are going to do

We are going to release Firefox 3.6.4 as a minor update to the 3.6 series in Lucid. This will also be rolled out to Hardy, Jaunty and Karmic (along with xulrunner 1.9.2.4). The update for Lucid is quite trivial, but the update in Hardy, Jaunty and Karmic is not quite as simple.

Before releasing these updates to the public, we need testing in Firefox, the extensions in the archive and distributions upgrades after those updates. We have published all these packages in a PPA and we will track test results before moving anything to the archive.

How you can help

We need people running *Hardy* (Jaunty and Karmic will see a similar call for testing in the following days) in bare metal or a virtual machine. If you are willing to help, you can follow the instructions below:

  1. Add the Mozilla Security PPA to your software sources

    You need to manually edit your /etc/apt/sources.list and add the following lines:


    deb http://ppa.launchpad.net/ubuntu-mozilla-security/ppa/ubuntu hardy main
    deb-src http://ppa.launchpad.net/ubuntu-mozilla-security/ppa/ubuntu hardy main

    After saving the file, you have to run:


    sudo apt-key adv --keyserver keyserver.ubuntu.com --recv-keys 7EBC211F
    sudo apt-get update
    sudo apt-get dist-upgrade

  2. You have to have an account in our tracking system. Go to http://mozilla.qa.ubuntu.com and click on “Log In” and “Create New Account”
  3. Explore your Firefox installation

    Basically we want people to perform the same activities that the do daily, without issues. In order to make testing easier, this is a checklist of things worth looking:

    • The upgrade to Firefox 3.6.4 goes smoothly.
    • The extensions get upgraded as well.
    • All the Firefox plugins (i.e. Flash, Java) still work.
    • The extensions work correctly.
    • Full distributions upgrades are not broken.
    • Upgrades work with only the security pocket enabled (ie, hardy-updates disabled)

To report your findings you need to use the test tracker.

Once you have selected the Hardy image, you will see a set of “testcases”, with a summary of how many reports have been sent. Obviously, the most important one is “Firefox”.

List of testcases

Once you open one of the testcases, you will be able to report back your findings if something went wrong. Even if everything went fine, it is always good to report back the success (“Passed”) with a comment on the activities you performed.

Report back

Use the “Firefox” testcase for general testing (upgrade, rendering, plugins, etc.) and the rest of the testcases if you want to report something more specific (Upgrades to Lucid, specific extensions errors, etc.)

IMPORTANT!! How to file bugs

As we are testing a PPA, not an official Ubuntu package, if you find an issue is NOT OK to file a bug in Launchpad. Rather than doing so, please, just explain your issue in the Comments field of the tracker and mark the test as Failed.

The tracker requires a bug number in order to mark a test as Failed. To bypass this requirement, just use the bug number “1” 😉

Thanks for helping to maintain secured Ubuntu stable releases!

Written by Ara Pulido

June 1, 2010 at 10:09 am

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Upgrade to Lucid during Ubuntu Global Jam!

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Ubuntu Global Jam
As many of you already know, this weekend we are celebrating the Ubuntu Global Jam, an event where all the participating LoCo teams gather together and contribute to make Ubuntu even better. There are lots of ways to contribute, from developing, to translations, documentation, packaging or testing. This time we have introduced a new and very valuable way to contribute: Upgrade Jams.

The objective of the jam is easy and everybody can participate prior to start contributing to the rest of the tasks: upgrading your own machines to Lucid Lynx Beta 1 and report back your experience. You can find information about how to run an Upgrade Jam in the wiki.

Remember! When arriving to your local Ubuntu Global Jam, and before starting contributing to the rest of the activities, upgrade your system to Lucid! The ISO tracker is already waiting for your results!

Written by Ara Pulido

March 24, 2010 at 12:46 pm

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/me starts Ubuntu Live i386 full disk

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If you have ever participated in Ubuntu ISO testing you may know what this title is about. To coordinate testing and to avoid duplicating efforts, every time one of us starts a new testcase, we enter a line like the one in the title in the #ubuntu-testing Freenode IRC channel.

In this example it means that I have started the Full Disk testcase for the Ubuntu Live CD i386 image. Others willing to help will know that I am already working on that one and will be able to concentrate their efforts in other testcases.

This system is far from perfect, as not everybody is in IRC and, even if you are, you can lose the messages sent before you logged in.

To improve the system I have added a new “Started” status to the test reports. Now, when you start a testcase, instead of having to communicate it in the IRC channel, add a “Started” result to that testcase and others will know that you are working on it (it will show up in the list of results with an icon of a clock.

Testcase started

Hopefully this will improve the coordination of the ISO testing activities.

Written by Ara Pulido

January 11, 2010 at 10:56 am

Upgrade testing. Planning ahead

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As you may already know, next Ubuntu release, Lucid Lynx (10.04) is an LTS release.

For testers this means one important thing: upgrades should be smooth from either Ubuntu 9.10 (Karmic Koala) or latest Ubuntu LTS release (8.04, Hardy Heron).

As we all know, nowadays, computer storage is very very cheap, but bandwidth is not. Later in the cycle we are going to need to test as many upgrades from Hardy and Karmic as possible. So, why not planning ahead and start downloading today Hardy and Karmic images? The unstoppable Shane Fagan has started doing so already! You rock!

Later in the cycle you will be able to easily install Hardy or Karmic in a spare machine or a virtual machine and upgrade from there. You will have part of the work done. And you can start contributing to your beloved distribution just now 🙂

Other releases from Ubuntu derivatives can be found at:

Written by Ara Pulido

November 26, 2009 at 12:37 pm