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Archive for the ‘ubuntu testing team’ Category

LoCo Teams on the Hall Of Fame

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As you may know, during Maverick cycle we introduced statistics from our testers to be reflected in the Ubuntu Hall Of Fame. Well, now, and thanks to my good friend Daniel Holbach, we have, not only individual statistics, but also statistics by LoCo team.

This is how it looks on the Hall Of Fame. Nifty, isn’t it?

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Written by Ara Pulido

October 13, 2010 at 11:42 am

/me starts Ubuntu Live i386 full disk

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If you have ever participated in Ubuntu ISO testing you may know what this title is about. To coordinate testing and to avoid duplicating efforts, every time one of us starts a new testcase, we enter a line like the one in the title in the #ubuntu-testing Freenode IRC channel.

In this example it means that I have started the Full Disk testcase for the Ubuntu Live CD i386 image. Others willing to help will know that I am already working on that one and will be able to concentrate their efforts in other testcases.

This system is far from perfect, as not everybody is in IRC and, even if you are, you can lose the messages sent before you logged in.

To improve the system I have added a new “Started” status to the test reports. Now, when you start a testcase, instead of having to communicate it in the IRC channel, add a “Started” result to that testcase and others will know that you are working on it (it will show up in the list of results with an icon of a clock.

Testcase started

Hopefully this will improve the coordination of the ISO testing activities.

Written by Ara Pulido

January 11, 2010 at 10:56 am

Upgrade testing. Planning ahead

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As you may already know, next Ubuntu release, Lucid Lynx (10.04) is an LTS release.

For testers this means one important thing: upgrades should be smooth from either Ubuntu 9.10 (Karmic Koala) or latest Ubuntu LTS release (8.04, Hardy Heron).

As we all know, nowadays, computer storage is very very cheap, but bandwidth is not. Later in the cycle we are going to need to test as many upgrades from Hardy and Karmic as possible. So, why not planning ahead and start downloading today Hardy and Karmic images? The unstoppable Shane Fagan has started doing so already! You rock!

Later in the cycle you will be able to easily install Hardy or Karmic in a spare machine or a virtual machine and upgrade from there. You will have part of the work done. And you can start contributing to your beloved distribution just now 🙂

Other releases from Ubuntu derivatives can be found at:

Written by Ara Pulido

November 26, 2009 at 12:37 pm

Ubuntu Testing Team

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If you think that testing software is an unskilled activity that “even a two-year-old can perform”, keep reading, I’ll try to change your mind. If you do not agree with that sentence, keep reading, you may be interested in joining us.

Software testing is generally seen as the poor cousin of programming. While the bad reputation of testers happens in all software environments, this is more common in free software communities, probably because the “show me the code” motto is too deeply attached to the open source communities. This, unfortunately, is too often translated in unreliable software released with a lot of bugs (some of them critical).

Testing software, as any human activity, is a task that almost everybody can perform to some sort of proficiency. However, that does not mean that it is an unskilled activity. You have to know what to do. You need to have (or to develop), among others, excellent communication skills, technical writing skills, software architecture knowledge, technical research expertise, a critical mindset, etc.

We cannot leave quality to good luck. We cannot rely in having millions of users who will find bugs as they use the applications. Our users want to use the software, not to find bugs and report them. FOSS projects in general and Ubuntu in particular need a new way of rethinking testing as a skilled activity and an opportunity to contribute to the project.

We want to build a Testing Team in Ubuntu to try to minimize the impact of bugs in the released versions. This team would have a mailing list and regular meetings on IRC. Activities will be diverse and will include things like: formal manual testing, exploratory testing, writing new test cases, organize and conduct community testing days, automated testing and developing new tools (yes, if you like to code, there’s also a place for you).

We would love you to join us and make it happen.

We are having a session at UDS Lucid to discuss this topic (scheduled for Wednesday). You can subscribe to the blueprint as well.

Written by Ara Pulido

November 10, 2009 at 4:13 pm