Let’s test Ubuntu NOW!

Making Ubuntu better, if possible

Posts Tagged ‘ubuntu

Some updates on Mago

leave a comment »

I have been busy with the release of Ubuntu 10.04 LTS and, although it may seem that Mago activity has decreased, there are some news related to the project that I want to share before UDS.

Ubuntu 10.04 LTS has been released with Mago 0.2, which is the release of Mago compatible with LDTP 2.0. Earlier this year, LDTP team released a complete rewrite of the testing framework in Python. After LDTP 2.0. arrived in Lucid, Mago suffered some weeks of instability, until it was working again with the new API. Also, I gained upload rights for ldtp and mago packages last week and, hopefully, this will be reflected in more activity during the Maverick cycle.

There is going to be work related to GUI testing during Maverick cycle, and some of them have been already reflected as blueprints for discussion during UDS:

Mago internationalization:
Mago works only with “C” locale applications. We need to modify it in order to make it work with different locales. This will be useful for local Ubuntu derivatives and to test language packs.

Mago Daily:
We aim to be running Mago tests on a daily basis. One of the biggest challenges to achieve this is having perfect integration of Mago with Checkbox. We will be discussing previous problems and will try to find a solution.

Roundtable: GUI Testing:
We will be discussing the different solutions for GUI testing available, their advantages and disadvantages. Sikuli, Mago, kvm-autotest, among others.

So, if you are coming to UDS (or want to participate remotely) and are interested in automated GUI testing, feel free to subscribe to those blueprints and participate in the discussion. See you all there!

Update:
James Tatum, a Mago contributor who is also coming to UDS, points me to another blueprint for discussion.

Simplify the creation of tests in Mago:
Adding applications to the Mago library is cumbersome. To foster the creation of more test cases, we will discuss ways to make this easier.

Advertisements

Written by Ara Pulido

May 3, 2010 at 2:26 pm

Posted in mago

Tagged with , , ,

Upgrade to Lucid during Ubuntu Global Jam!

leave a comment »

Ubuntu Global Jam
As many of you already know, this weekend we are celebrating the Ubuntu Global Jam, an event where all the participating LoCo teams gather together and contribute to make Ubuntu even better. There are lots of ways to contribute, from developing, to translations, documentation, packaging or testing. This time we have introduced a new and very valuable way to contribute: Upgrade Jams.

The objective of the jam is easy and everybody can participate prior to start contributing to the rest of the tasks: upgrading your own machines to Lucid Lynx Beta 1 and report back your experience. You can find information about how to run an Upgrade Jam in the wiki.

Remember! When arriving to your local Ubuntu Global Jam, and before starting contributing to the rest of the activities, upgrade your system to Lucid! The ISO tracker is already waiting for your results!

Written by Ara Pulido

March 24, 2010 at 12:46 pm

Posted in ubuntu

Tagged with , , ,

/me starts Ubuntu Live i386 full disk

with 2 comments

If you have ever participated in Ubuntu ISO testing you may know what this title is about. To coordinate testing and to avoid duplicating efforts, every time one of us starts a new testcase, we enter a line like the one in the title in the #ubuntu-testing Freenode IRC channel.

In this example it means that I have started the Full Disk testcase for the Ubuntu Live CD i386 image. Others willing to help will know that I am already working on that one and will be able to concentrate their efforts in other testcases.

This system is far from perfect, as not everybody is in IRC and, even if you are, you can lose the messages sent before you logged in.

To improve the system I have added a new “Started” status to the test reports. Now, when you start a testcase, instead of having to communicate it in the IRC channel, add a “Started” result to that testcase and others will know that you are working on it (it will show up in the list of results with an icon of a clock.

Testcase started

Hopefully this will improve the coordination of the ISO testing activities.

Written by Ara Pulido

January 11, 2010 at 10:56 am

Upgrade testing. Planning ahead

with 6 comments

As you may already know, next Ubuntu release, Lucid Lynx (10.04) is an LTS release.

For testers this means one important thing: upgrades should be smooth from either Ubuntu 9.10 (Karmic Koala) or latest Ubuntu LTS release (8.04, Hardy Heron).

As we all know, nowadays, computer storage is very very cheap, but bandwidth is not. Later in the cycle we are going to need to test as many upgrades from Hardy and Karmic as possible. So, why not planning ahead and start downloading today Hardy and Karmic images? The unstoppable Shane Fagan has started doing so already! You rock!

Later in the cycle you will be able to easily install Hardy or Karmic in a spare machine or a virtual machine and upgrade from there. You will have part of the work done. And you can start contributing to your beloved distribution just now 🙂

Other releases from Ubuntu derivatives can be found at:

Written by Ara Pulido

November 26, 2009 at 12:37 pm

Let’s test Karmic RC!

leave a comment »

This Thursday Karmic reaches the last milestone before the final release. As for every milestone, we need to test all the ISO images we produce, with every possible installation.

All of these test cases will appear, with instructions to follow, in the ISO tracker. If you don’t know how to use the tracker, this blog post will serve as starting guide.

One of the complains of the new comers is that they don’t know which test case needs testing. The coordination is done at #ubuntu-testing at Freenode and not everybody can access IRC. This time, Dave Morley and I, will try something new. As the RC images start appearing and testing begins, we are going to update in Twitter, using #ubuntutesting as tag.

If you want to help us testing RC images, please, follow us in Twitter and make sure to search for #ubuntutesting for updates. And if you’re helping testing, please, tweet about it!

Of course, this is an extra way to get informed. Coordination will happen, as usual, at #ubuntu-testing IRC channel.

Written by Ara Pulido

October 19, 2009 at 9:02 am

Thanks! (Beta ISO Testing)

with one comment

Ubuntu 9.10 (Karmic Koala) Beta was released last Thursday. I am so glad to announced that we 98.9% coverage of the test cases in the ISO tracker. I would like to thank the community members that helped testing the ISOs, specially those who joined recently. Thanks! I am discussing with the Community team about the possibility of including this participation in the Ubuntu Hall Of Fame, just as the bug triagers or sponsors are.

I will blog about Release Candidate ISO testing as we approach the milestone week 😉

Also, and because we are getting new contributions, I would like to comment some of the reports we got, so we can improve every milestone.

Not really a failure

We got this comment, in a test case marked as failure:

I have a tablet fujitsu p1630 and the stylus works in the life cd! great, congratulations!
(missing is the calibration tool which should be loaded. The stylus is not properly calibrated and cannot reach the top line (where the application menus sit!).[…]

In the ISO test tracker we mark as failures those experiences that prevented us to do what we want to achieve in that test case. I.e. If we want to install, and the partition manager fails, that’s a failure. If we do install (or can access to the Live environement, as in this case), the test didn’t fail as such. We would mark that as success, but will link the non-critical bugs that we find.

Usability bugs are bugs

The lack of colour in the default options during installation could cause problems for new users.
The default setting of Mute, for sound could cause problems for new users.

These are great examples of usability bugs. Thanks for noticing them! Usability bugs are bugs, so do not only put them as comments in your report, also go and file bugs in Launchpad for them. They will help a lot to new users to understand how Ubuntu works.

Written by Ara Pulido

October 6, 2009 at 11:34 am

Accessibility (lack-of) information

with 3 comments

One of the main issues when getting information from the AT-SPI layer is that most of the accessibility information is missing. Names are almost never set, therefore, objects take the name of the current text.

This is something generally painful, as tests will need to be localized for each language. Let’s imagine that we have a form called “Update Manager”, then the object would be frmUpdatemanager. If we change the target system language, let’s say, to Spanish, then the window will be named “Gestor de Actualizaciones”, and the accessibility information in this case would be frmGestordeactualizaciones.

As I wrote in my previous post, we are trying to separate as much as possible this kind of information from the scripts code. Apart from having classes for the common activities with applications, the text in windows, buttons, etc. is maintained in a separate file, ubuntu_constants.py that will be, eventually, the only file to be changed when porting the tests to a different language.

Written by Ara Pulido

August 7, 2008 at 3:24 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

Tagged with , ,